Inspecting a Cathedral Ceiling – Barrie Home Inspector

The main concern when inspecting or building a cathedral ceiling is avoiding problems with condensation, leaks, mould and damage to structural members due to poorly installed insulation.

There are typically two ways to insulate a cathedral ceiling; vented and unvented insulation.  Unvented is known as Cathedral Ceiling Insulation“hot roof” due to lack of heat dissipation through venting.  The main concern with “hot roof” method is that a hotter roof results in shorter shingle life and any leaks can cause mould and moisture issues in cavity.

Vented cathedral ceilings will either have an air space or have soffit baffles installed, which will allow for movement of air and allow heat to dissipate.

Cathedral ceilings were once very popular due to their impressive height and appearance, but ensuring proper insulation and venting has become a known issue. Inspecting your insulation is usually very limited and will typically be confined to small inspection area that may have been left open.

  1. Moisture Control

Installing your cathedral ceiling insulation, most people don’t realize that you have to install some form of moisture control system. The normal installation method involves putting insulation into your cavity, leaving a small area at the top allowing air to circulate. This air carries moisture with it, so that you now have a working moisture control method of removing damp from behind the insulation.

  1. Batt Insulation

Many insulation experts say that fiberglass batts are the worst insulation to install in a cathedral ceiling. Fiberglass allows movement of air, but doesn’t stop the moisture from penetrating behind the insulation. If you want to insulation your cathedral ceiling properly, then you need to develop another method of keeping in heat while avoiding becoming a target for mold and damp. If you do decide to use a batting insulation then you have to develop an method of preventing moisture from entering cavity.

  1. Dense Packing

Spray foam can prevent moisture entry while providing the insulation rating that you require. The expense of spray foam application can prevent many home owners from using this method.  Fiberglass batts on the other hand are loose filled batts which allow air to infiltrate and provide insulation by providing a resistance to heat loss.  Unfortunately the fiberglass also allows moist air to enter and when in contact with cooler air, (dew point) creates moisture.  This is where mould and wood rotting may occur.

ShoeNet Wholesale Prices – Fraud Alert

ShoeNet.com has taken over where ShoeBay.net and BKSneakerOutlet.com have left off.  This is a Fraud Alert to help people save ther money. These names have become synonymous with Internet Fraud and they have since shut down their phone lines and emails sent to their respective companies are bounced back.  This is typical of any ongoing Fraud Operation, as they dump their websites once the General Public becomes aware of these scams being perpetrated on innocent people.

Stealing money from customers is how ShoeNet.com is staying in business.  Taking orders from customers and stealing their money is how this company stays in business.  Promising great prices, offering to help open a shoe store, offering super prices on container sized shipments, all to lure in customers so they can steal their hard earned money.

Doing a simple Search on Google for “ShoeNet Complaints” will bring a wealth of unhappy customers who have had their money stolen by this, “Shoe Wholesalers”.

TrustPilot.com

Steal Your Money – No Shoes

I ordered wholesale shoes from ShoeBay and did not receive them. I called and called with no satisfaction. Now they have disconnected their phones and their emails bounce back. They are now using ShoeNet as their main sales site but still will not refund my money. Don’t trust them.

Multiple Companies – Rip Off Artists

I ordered shoes from BKSneakersOutlet which now has no phone service and no email service. The same people are running ShoeNet and they will not return my money. These people are thieves. Read the reviews below, not the “spammy ones” and you will understand.

DO NOT TRUST THEM

These reviews are all fake, except for the people who got ripped off. Danny Yokoal and company are shoe pirates who need to be prosecuted for the fraud they are committing. Please do not trust the stars they are receiving.

These people are thieves and will take your money. Do not trust them with your hard earned cash. They have previously taken orders and not supplied product, just keeping the money. They are “shoe pirates” visit our site at shoebay (dot) info for more information. Anyone else want to share horror stories please email me Nicholasefrost@gmail the list is long. Please, visit website !!

There are sites in the United States, Austrailia, United Kingdom and Canada who have complaints from people who have been “Ripped Off” from ShoeNet.com

 

Replacement and Repair Costs

 

 

Use the following information to get a good idea of the costs associated with this comprehensive list of small to large renovation and construction projects. If you have any other prices you think should be added or changed, please email us with any updates and or changes. All rights are reserved and this list is copyrighted but it can be used for personal use and any other use will only be allowed upon written permission from OntarioContractors.com.

Roofing & Flashing
Removal of existing material, disposal & clean-up. $0.50 – 2.00 sq.ft.
Garbage Bin – small $250
Garbage Bin – large $475
* additional $50 per pick-up and dumping fee from your local dump (tonnage) will be added to the above charges.

 

Roofing (material & labour)
1. Asphalt Shingles – felt base $1.50 – 1.75 sq.ft.
2. Roofing Labour only
another rule of thumb is using the pitch number and multiplying it by the number of bundles to come up with the cost of labour plus 10 % – no removal of existing material. i.e. pitch * bundles = labour (+ 10 %)
3. Asphalt Shingles – fibreglass base $2.00 – 3.00 sq.ft.
4. Cedar Shakes – hand split $2.60 – 2.80 sq.ft.
5. Cedar Shingles – saw cut $2.40 – 3.00 sq.ft.
6. Steel shingles – painted $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
7. Steel shingles – vinyl coated $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
8. Steel roof – sheeting 3 times cost of ashphalt shingles
9. Aluminum shingles – paint finish $5.50 – 5.25 sq.ft.
10. Plastic Shakes – colour through $3.50 – 5.25 sq.ft.
11. Tiles – Concrete or Clay $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
12. New slate roof $10.00 – 30.00 sq.ft.
13. Slate roof – with replacement $30.00 – 50.00 sq.ft.
14. New roof sheeting – plywood or waferboard $1.50 – 2.00 sq.ft.
15. Roll roofing $1.10 – 2.20 sq.ft.
16. Built up Tar & Gravel roof $4.00 – 6.00 sq.ft.
17. Membrane roof n/a
18. Sprayed Polyurethane foam $1.60 – 2.50 sq.ft.
19. Painted Membrane $0.55 – 1.50 sq.ft.
* Contractor call out for repair – $300 minimum

 

Flashing
It is advisable to replace all roof flashing at the time a new roof is installed. The cost of installations at that time is minimal, compared to possible problems old flashing may cause if they remained. Counter flashing may be installed at any time over existing step or chimney flashing and can be colour coordinated to a homes exterior.
Step Flashing usually included w/roof price
Counter Flashing – galvanized sheet metal $1.50 – 2.50 lin.ft.
Counter Flashing – sheet aluminum $3.00 – 6.00 lin.ft.
Drip Edge – usually included $1.00 – 2.00 lin.ft.
Chimney Flashing – galvanized usually included
Chimney Cricket – aluminum or galvanized $200.00 – 500.00
Skylight Flashing – aluminum or galvanized $200.00 – up
Vinyl Flashing – patch repair only $175.00 – 275.00
Replace Parapet wall flashing $10.00 – 40.00 lin.ft.
Plumbing Vent flashing $95.00 – $155 each

 

Chimneys
Reconstruction of any Chimney is difficult to assess and no repair can be called typical, since many factors such as height, required scaffolding etc. will have to be taken into consideration. Therefore it is recommended that you call three contractors for estimates and base your choice not on price but the contractors reputation and references.
Re-brick Chimney above roofline – single flue $150.00 – up lin.ft.
Re-brick Chimney above roofline – double flue $200.00 – up lin.ft.
Replace Prefabed Chimney section $65.00 – 150.00 per section
Repoint Masonry – above roofline $20.00 – 50.00 per row
Install Chimney Cap $125.00 – 500.00 each
Chimney/rain Cap $35.00 – 100.00 each

 

Gutters & Downpipes
Gutters & downpipes – aluminum $1.50 – 4.00 lin.ft.
Supply extruded gutter only $2.00-3.00 lin.ft.
Gutters & downpipes – vinyl $2.50 – 4.00 lin.ft.
Gutters & downpipes – copper $10.00 – 25.00 lin.ft.
Downpipe Extension – replace $15.00 – 75.00 each
Eaves cleaning – end of fall $150.00 – 250.00

 

Fascia, Soffit & Exterior Trim – Supply & installed
All aluminum & vinyl soffit or fascia is usually installed over a solid base like plywood-extra is required for prefabrication.
Wood Fascia Board – non painted $2.00 – 3.75 lin.ft.
Aluminum fascia $1.80 – 3.50 lin.ft.
Vinyl fascia $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Aluminum soffits $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Vinyl soffits $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Decorative trims – wall mouldings $6.00 – up lin.ft.
Decorative & functional vents $85.00 – $150 each

 

Exterior Finishes
* Pricing is per square foot of “board” not per square foot of house space.
Aluminum siding-non insulated $1.90 – 3.00 sq.ft.
(if you were making the exterior truly maintenace free then you would have to add the costs for fascia, soffit,gutter & downpipe installation for the total price for a complete upgrade to aluminum siding-watch out for these pricing tricks or “extra’s” – see above pricing)
Aluminum siding – some insulation $2.40 – 4.80 sq.ft.
Aluminum siding – R2000 $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Vinyl siding – not insulated $1.80 – 3.60 sq.ft.
Hardboard Siding – non insulated $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Wood siding – paint grade $1.80 – 4.80 sq.ft.
Wood siding – clear cedar $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Vinyl shakes $1.80 – 3.60 sq.ft.
Aluminum cladding – of windows, sills, posts etc. $1.80 – 12.00 lin.ft.
Exterior Stucco – sand & cement $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Exterior Stucco – Latex based $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Repointing – brick work $7.00 -10.00 sq.ft.
Brick – new installation $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Brick extra’s -arches over windows,coined corners $24.00 – up each
Brick -cost per 1,000 (average);approx 3.33/sq.ft. $440.00 – 850.00
Brick -labour cost per 1,000; you supply sand $550.00 – up
Replace brick $18.00 – up sq.ft.
Parapet Wall – reconstruction $25.00 – up sq.ft.
Stone Work – Man made stone $12.00 – 13.40 sq.ft.
Stone Work – Natural stone $20.00 – 36.00 sq.ft.
Brick cleaning-Chemical wash $2.40 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Brick Sealing -after cleaning $0.65 – 1.80 sq.ft.
Exterior painting- fascia, soffit, doors, windows $1,200.00- up
Exterior painting- including trims & walls $2,500.00 – up
Foundation Parging $2.00 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Exterior foundation damp proofing $4,000.00 – up
Damp proofing – new house construction $1,200.00 – 1,500.00
* includes perimeter drainage tile, 3/4 gravel, tar spray & plastic membrane skirt – usually this is included in the foundation price
Perimeter drainage tiles, O-pipe $4,000.00 – up
Foundation Cracks -wet basement $400.00 – 500.00
Interior foundation damp proofing /French Drain installation $2,200.00 – up / – up
Yard drainage $250.00 – up
Storm Windows – supplied & installed $175.00 – up each
Storm doors $375.00 – up each
Resurface existing Asphalt driveway $2.00 – 3.00 sq.ft.
Asphalt driveway – new construction $1.00 – 1.25 sq.ft.
Seal Asphalt driveway $75.00 – up
Install interlocking paving stone driveway $2.00 – 7.00 sq.ft.
New concrete driveway – plain $4.00 – 7.00 sq.ft.
New concrete driveway – stamped; stampcrete $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Install wooden deck $1,200.00 – up
Deck – Supply and Install $20.00 sq.ft.
Concrete patio $6.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Concrete patio stones $2.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Exterior basement stairway restoration $1,500 – up
Exterior basement stairway installation $4,000.00 – up
Exterior basement stairway installation – new house $1,200.00 – 1,500.00 each
Existing Exterior basement stairway – drainage $500.00 – up
Demolition and removal of detached garage $2,300 – up
Construction of a new detached garage – single $10,000.00 – up
Construction of a new detached garage – double $15,000.00 – up
Garage doors – single $800.00 – 1,500.00
Garage doors – double $1000.00 – 2,000.00
* eg. 2 maintenance free aluminum insulated doors for a new house construction or rough – in ready installation costs $1,200.00 in the London Area.
Garage door opener $350.00 – 500.00
Replace porch or deck flooring $3.00 – up
Replace porch or deck skirting $3.00 – up
Replace porch stairs – wood $200.00 – up
Replace porch stairs – concrete $300.00 – up
Replace porch stair railings $200.00 – up
Replace porch railings $8.00 – up lin.ft.
Retaining wall – wood $20.00 – up sq.ft.
Retaining wall – concrete $30.00 – up sq.ft.
Retaining wall – gabion;rock basket $25.00 – up sq.ft. /-up lin ft
Retaining wall – steel erosion control $130.00 -up lin.ft.
Property fencing – wood $15.00 – up lin.ft.
Property fencing – chain link $8.00 – up lin.ft.
Lawn – New sod $1.50 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Lawn – New seed; seeding – 1/4 acre lot $500.00 – up
Lawn sprinkler system $1,000.00 – up

 

Structure Modifications & Renovations
Foundation – Underpin one corner of house $3,000.00 – up
Foundation – Underpin or add $3,000.00 – up
Foundation – Lower basement floor by underpinning $5,000.00 – up
Lower basement floor with bench footings $5,000.00 – up
Replace load bearing basement beam $1,600.00 – up
Install additional joist along side for support $110.00 – up
Jackpost – install $325.00 – 550.00
Termite treatment – chemical $1,200.00 – up
Termite inspection $150.00 – 200.00
Opening or Removal of bearing wall $750.00 – 1,500.00
Opening & Installing door in interior wall $600.00 – up
Rebuild arch over door or window openings $500.00 – up
Install lintel in masonary wall opening $350.00 – up
Construct exterior basement stairwell $5,000.00 – up
Collar Ties $300.00 – up
Collar Tie bracing $150.00 – 250.00
Building an addition – basic quality $70.00 – 90.00 sq.ft.
Building an addition – good quality $90.00 – 110.00 sq.ft.
Building an addition – Custom quality $110.00 – up sq.ft.

 

Interior Renovations
Remove old plaster & install drywall $2.50 -5.00 sq.ft.
Install drywall over exiting plaster $1.50 – 3.00 (board) sq.ft.
New Plaster $8.00 – 11..00 sq.ft.
Install drywall in an unfinished area -supply and install/no insulation $7.00 – 9.00 sq.ft. floor space/.14 sq.ft. board
Texture spray ceiling $1.00 – up sq.ft.
* New house construction- 080 sq.ft. board -board, mud/tape, labour only.
Suspended Ceiling Tile Installation $2.50 – 6.00 sq.ft.
Acoustic Ceiling Tile Installation $1.50 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Sand & Finish existing wood floors $2.00 – 4.00 sq.ft.
Wood floor installation $5.50 – 12.00 sq.ft.
Ceramic Tile – Supply & install $10.00 – up sq.ft.
Ceramic Tile – labour only $5.50 -8.00 sq.ft.
Underlay – installation only $1.50 -2.00 sq.ft.
Vinyl floor tiles – supply & install $2.00 – up sq.ft.
Vinyl sheet flooring/linoleum $6.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – synthetic $15.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – natural wool $50.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – underpading $5.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – cleaning/steam/chemical $30.00 – up per room
Windows-replacement – 1,800 sq.ft. house $10,000.00 approx.
* amount may vary depending upon the situation.
Windows – sliders, casement, awning, doublehung – installed $140.00 – up
Windows – fixed, bay, bow, round – installed $1,200.00- up
Doors – exterior, insulated,metal $750.00 – up
Doors – exterior, solid wood $850.00 – up
Doors – exterior, fibreglass $900.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, insul., metal $1,200.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, solid wood $1,500.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, fibreglass $2,000.00 – up
Replace entrance door latch & lock set $150.00 – up
Install decorative glass in entrance door $500.00 – up
New Storm door $450.00 – up
Install patio doors – brick wall $2,500.00 – up
Install patio doors – wood frame wall $2000.00 – up
Replace existing patio doors $1000.00 – 2000.00
Install basic skylight $1,000.00 – up
Install venting skylight $1,500.00 – up
Fireplace – Masonry $2,500.00 – up
* Note: Ont. Building Code for new house construction may require CO detector & fresh air exchanger ($2,500.00 – up) for wood burning fireplaces-gas does not require this.
Fireplace – Zero clearance $2,000.00 – up
Fireplace – Natural Gas $2,300.00 – up
Glass fireplace doors $250.00 – up
Install Fireplace damper $250.00 – up
Chimney cleaning $200.00 – 375.00
Video Chimney inspection $250.00 – up
Video Plumbing inspection $150.00 – up
* Video inspections start at $110/hr – plumbing, chimney – whatever the case.
Interior door – hollow core, hardware incl $150.00 – up
Interior door – solid core, hardware incl. $400.00 – up
French doors $600.00 – up
Bifold doors $75.00 – up
Louvred Bifold doors $150.00 – up
Sliding closet doors $200.00 – up
Sliding mirror closet doors $350.00 – up
Kitchen renovation – full $7,000.00 – up
Kitchen Cabinets – replace $150.00 – up lin.ft.
Kitchen counter – replace $25.00 – up lin.ft.
Stove fan-venting outside $475.00 – up
Ceiling fan – installed $200.00 – up
Painting – interior – whole house $1,500.00 – up
Wallpaper – hanging $2.00 – up sq.ft.
Central vacuum system $800.00 – up
Security System – you own $600.00 – up

 

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
Mid efficiency Furnace – supply & install $2,500.00 -3,500.00
High effiency furnace – supply & install $3,500.00 – 4,500.00
Boiler System $3,500.00 – up
Humidifier $400.00 -500.00
Electronic air cleaner $500.00 – 1,000.00
New circulating pump $450.00 – 700.00
Expansion tank $360.00 – 650.00
New Chimney liner $330.00 – 700.00
Remove old oil tank $300.00 – 800.00
Replace radiator $300.00 – 1,000.00
Replace radiator control valve $150.00 – 300.00
Install baseboard heaters $150.00 – 300.00
Convert furnace from oil to natural gas (if possible) $900.00 – 1,500.00
Change heating from Hot water to gas – single level $7,500.00 – 9,500.00
Change heating from Hot water to gas – double level $15,000.00 – 20,000.00
Change ducts from gravity to forced air $1,000.00 – 1,500.00
Duct cleaning $250.00 – 350.00
Annual Service $150.00 – 250.00
Air Conditioning – add to existing forced air $1,700.00 – 3,000.00
Heat Pump – add to existing /Geothermal $2,500.00 – 4,000.00 / ,000 & up
Replace compressor on heat pump/air conditioner $800.00 – 1,400.00
Air conditioning – independent system $8,000.00 – 15,000.00

 

Electrical
* Installation & supply is assumed, and the contractor is on the site for more than one electrical job listed below, otherwise sufficient allowances for travel time and increased costs/opportunity costs, should be made.
Upgrade service to 100 amps – incl. New breaker panel $850.00 – 1100.00
Upgrade service to 100 amps – no breaker panel $800.00 – 1200.00
Upgrade service to 200 amps $1,000.00 – 1,500.00
Replace main ground – public water sytem $200.00 – 350.00
Replace main ground – private well to ground rods $275.00 – 500.00
New Breaker Panel $700.00 – 1200.00
Auxiliary Panel $300.00 – 600.00
Replace circuit breaker – 20 amps or less $80.00 – 110.00
Add 120 V circuit – ie fridge, freezer etc $250.00 – 400.00
Install exterior outlet $250.00 – 400.00
Add 240 V circuit – ie. Stove, dryer $350.00 – 650.00
Add Kitchen split receptacle $250.00 – 450.00
Supply ground for std. receptacles $75.00 – 150.00
Replace receptacles with GFI (Ground Fault Interrupt) $90.00 – 120.00 each
Correct reversed polarity $15.00 – 25.00 each
Install switches $20.00 – 40.00 each
Install light fixture $100.00 – 250.00
Exterior light fixture $175.00 – 250.00

 

Plumbing
Replace old (galvanized or steel) piping w/ copper /Pex $1,500.00 – 4,000.00
Replace main water line to residence $1,900.00 – 4,000.00
Replace interior main shut off valve $275.00 – 375.00
Replace water heater $550.00 – 1,200.00
* or lease-may not cost you except monthly charges as low as $20/mth
Average monthly water heater rental $20/mth-up
Unclogging Toilet $150.00 – 200.00
Toilet Replacement -supply & install $300.00 – up
Replace toilet seal $100.00 – 200.00
Replace flushing mechanism $125.00 – 175.00
Supply & install bidet $500.00 – up
Replace vanity & counter – single basin $300.00 – up
Replace vanity & counter – double Basin $500.00 – up
Replace basin – vanity $175.00 – up
Replace basin – pedestal $325.00 – up
Replace faucets $150.00 – up
Replace bathtub & new ceramic tiles $1,500.00 – up
Refinish existing tub $1000.00 – up
Replace shower & tub faucets $325.00 – up
Replace tile tub area $800.00 – up
Replace caulk bathtub $175.00 – 350.00
Replace leaking shower stall pan $1,000.00 – 2000.00
Reconstruction of ceramic tile shower stall $1,500.00 – up
New installation of ceramic tile shower stall $1,500.00 – up
Installation of new plastic tub enclosure $550.00 – 850.00
Install PVC or fibreglass shower stall $1200.00 – 2,000.00
Install Whirlpool / Jacuzzi tub $2,000.00 – up
Install exhaust fan $375.00 – 500.00
Complete bathroom renovation $9,000.00 – up
Construction of a basement bathroom -plumbing only $3,600.00 – up
Install laundry tub $350.00 – 500.00
Install laundry facilities – water supply, drain $1,000.00 – up
Supply & install kitchen sink – single $350.00 – up
Supply & install kitchen sink – double $400.00 – up
Supply & install dishwasher $500.00 – 1,000.00
Dishwasher hook-up – rough-in complete $145.00 – 195.00
Dishwasher hook-up – no rough-in /electrical needed e.g. $195.00 – 350.00
Supply & install garbage disposal $300.00 – 600.00
Install stove hood $150.00 – up
Install solid waste pump $1,600.00 – 2,000.00
Connect waste piping to municipal sewers $2,000.00 – up
Clear out obstructions in sewer line $195.00 – up
Repair collapsed sewer line section $1200.00 – up
Video observation / investigation $110.00 / hr – up
Install submersible well pump $800.00 – up
Install suction or jet pump $600.00 – 1,000.00
Replace sewage ejector pump $500.00 – 800.00
Replace pump tank $250.00 – 500.00
Install water softener $1,000.00 – up
* Rental or lease – installation usually free w/ contract of approx. $20.00 /mth
Water softener rental or lease $20.00 – up /mth.
Outdoor hose / water valve / sediment faucet $150.00 – 300.00 each
Replace sump pump $295.00 – 385.00

 

Insulation
Insulate attic to current standards $0.50 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Insulation blown into flat roof or wall cavity $2.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Add attic vents $40.00 – 250.00 each
UFFI removal $10,000.00 – up
Exterior insulation using rigid boards $1,500.00 – up
Insulate basement interior $0.50 – up sq.ft.
Sprayed foam / uerethane foam $ ?

 

 

 

Fireplace Inspections

Fireplace Inspections.  With the price of oil going through the roof, more and more people are turning to wood burning systems to heat their homes. While cheaper than oil, it also poses a greater risk of fire. If you currently heat your home (completely or partially) with wood, most insurance companies will require your unit to be inspected by a Wood Energy Technical Transfer (WETT) specialist.

Pellet Stoves are typically clean-burning that stoves form one leg of a dual-fuel strategy that is appealing to growing numbers of homeowners concerned with personal independence, sustainability and cost savings. Unlike oil and natural gas, wood pellets typically are produced close to where they’re used-reducing the energy used in transportation-and they come from a renewable resource. Most compellingly, the pellets are made from a sawmill waste product-no trees are cut just to manufacture them.

After the firebox is clean, operate the damper as you watch to see that it closes and opens smoothly and fits securely in the brackets. You may want to wear safety glasses here, as the damper may be coated with creosote and ash buildup, which can drop in your eyes. When you are finished checking the damper, be sure it is in the closed position.

In Ontario fireplace hearths are required to be built of non-combustible material and extend a minimum of 18 inches in front of firebox. Some companies make a ULC rated hearth pad which can be used for hardwood floors etc. If you have brick installed they have to be sealed with mortar etc. to ensure embers do not fall between the cracks.

Creosote is actually very flammable, so you need to make sure that you’re having it cleaned regularly. Most professionals recommend that you have a chimney sweep in when the soot and/or creosote gets up to an eighth of an inch deep. It is rather difficult for a homeowner to be able to measure the soot level, so be sure to ask your professional inspector how deep the soot is at the time of your professional wood fireplace inspections. He will most likely recommend having a professional chimney sweep clean your chimney.

A vent shall not terminate less than 2.1 m above any public sidewalk, lane or street or right of way. It shall not be within 1.8 m of a mechanical air supply inlet to a building. The vent shall not be within 1 m of a building opening or air inlet or another appliance or within 1 meter of the center line of an exterior gas meter.

If you are buying an older home with a masonry fireplace it is always recommended that you hire a professional chimney sweep to clean chimney prior to having WETT inspection. It is impossible to see cracked tiles or deterioration if chimney has layer of soot and creosote on tiles. Cleaning chimney will remove soot and creosote and allow proper inspection of fireplace chimney. Usually professional chimney sweeps are also WETT Certified.

Looking to find the best Innisfil Home Inspection Company, then visit www.innisfilhomeinspector.com to find you get with A Innisfil Home Inspection for you.

Buying Your First Home

Buying Your First Home, Knowledge is said to open doors. This is literally true when it comes to buying a home. To become a first-time homebuyer, you need to know where and how to begin the home buying process.

If your planning on raising a family, or have one already started, schools maybe the most important item on your list of required items. Check with your local school board or realtor to find out specific educational requirements in your area.

Choosing a home that meets today’s and your future needs can save you a lot of headaches down the road. Moving or expanding your current house selection to suit an expanding family can be expensive.

Finding a Realtor can be as easy as asking your friends for a referral or looking online for an agent in your area. When choosing your Realtor you want to ensure you find one who puts your needs and interests before their own.

Financial planning is an important part of buying a home and includes more than just the purchase price of the home. Most home buyers will go to their financial institution of choice and be Pre-Approved for a mortgage amount so that they know what price range of homes they can afford. In a competitive market, where time is essential, this can make the difference when bidding on a property when other buyers are interested.

After finding your new home you then have to consider the closing costs which will be added on to the price of your new home. There is the land transfer tax, HST, Lawyers fees and the Title Insurance which all have to be paid. Property taxes, home insurance, mortgage insurance and water bills are all recurring expenses you have to budget for.

Hire a professional home inspector to ensure your property is built according to the appropriate building code. Failure to inspect just this one area can cost you thousands of dollars and needless headaches if work was done in your home by un-licensed tradespeople. A home inspection is a small price to pay for the peace of mind you receive.

Your home inspection report, prepared by the Barrie Home Inspector will include a review of your heating system, electrical system, air conditioner, interior plumbing, roof, attic visible insulation, basement, foundation and any visible structure. The inspection will also include Free Thermal Imaging scan of home.

Want to find out more about The Barrie Home Inspector, then visit Roger Frost’s site on how to choose the best Home Inspector in Barrie for Peace of Mind.

Renovation and Building Costs

 

 

Use the following information to get a good idea of the costs associated with this comprehensive list of small to large renovation and construction projects. If you have any other prices you think should be added or changed, please email us with any updates and or changes. All rights are reserved and this list is copyrighted but it can be used for personal use and any other use will only be allowed upon written permission from OntarioContractors.com.

Roofing & Flashing
Removal of existing material, disposal & clean-up. $0.50 – 2.00 sq.ft.
Garbage Bin – small $250
Garbage Bin – large $475
* additional $50 per pick-up and dumping fee from your local dump (tonnage) will be added to the above charges.

 

Roofing (material & labour)
1. Asphalt Shingles – felt base $1.50 – 1.75 sq.ft.
2. Roofing Labour only  
another rule of thumb is using the pitch number and multiplying it by the number of bundles to come up with the cost of labour plus 10 % – no removal of existing material. i.e. pitch * bundles = labour (+ 10 %)
3. Asphalt Shingles – fibreglass base $2.00 – 3.00 sq.ft.
4. Cedar Shakes – hand split $2.60 – 2.80 sq.ft.
5. Cedar Shingles – saw cut $2.40 – 3.00 sq.ft.
6. Steel shingles – painted $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
7. Steel shingles – vinyl coated $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
8. Steel roof – sheeting 3 times cost of ashphalt shingles  
9. Aluminum shingles – paint finish $5.50 – 5.25 sq.ft.
10. Plastic Shakes – colour through $3.50 – 5.25 sq.ft.
11. Tiles – Concrete or Clay $4.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
12. New slate roof $10.00 – 30.00 sq.ft.
13. Slate roof – with replacement $30.00 – 50.00 sq.ft.
14. New roof sheeting – plywood or waferboard $1.50 – 2.00 sq.ft.
15. Roll roofing $1.10 – 2.20 sq.ft.
16. Built up Tar & Gravel roof $4.00 – 6.00 sq.ft.
17. Membrane roof n/a 
18. Sprayed Polyurethane foam $1.60 – 2.50 sq.ft.
19. Painted Membrane $0.55 – 1.50 sq.ft.
* Contractor call out for repair – $300 minimum

 

Flashing
It is advisable to replace all roof flashing at the time a new roof is installed. The cost of installations at that time is minimal, compared to possible problems old flashing may cause if they remained. Counter flashing may be installed at any time over existing step or chimney flashing and can be colour coordinated to a homes exterior.
Step Flashing usually included w/roof price
Counter Flashing – galvanized sheet metal $1.50 – 2.50 lin.ft.
Counter Flashing – sheet aluminum $3.00 – 6.00 lin.ft.
Drip Edge – usually included $1.00 – 2.00 lin.ft.
Chimney Flashing – galvanized usually included
Chimney Cricket – aluminum or galvanized $200.00 – 500.00
Skylight Flashing – aluminum or galvanized $200.00 – up
Vinyl Flashing – patch repair only $175.00 – 275.00
Replace Parapet wall flashing $10.00 – 40.00 lin.ft.
Plumbing Vent flashing $95.00 – $155 each

 

 

Chimneys
Reconstruction of any Chimney is difficult to assess and no repair can be called typical, since many factors such as height, required scaffolding etc. will have to be taken into consideration. Therefore it is recommended that you call three contractors for estimates and base your choice not on price but the contractors reputation and references.
Re-brick Chimney above roofline – single flue $150.00 – up lin.ft.
Re-brick Chimney above roofline – double flue $200.00 – up lin.ft.
Replace Prefabed Chimney section $65.00 – 150.00 per section
Repoint Masonry – above roofline $20.00 – 50.00 per row
Install Chimney Cap $125.00 – 500.00 each
Chimney/rain Cap $35.00 – 100.00 each

 

 

Gutters & Downpipes
Gutters & downpipes – aluminum $1.50 – 4.00 lin.ft.
Supply extruded gutter only $2.00-3.00 lin.ft.
Gutters & downpipes – vinyl $2.50 – 4.00 lin.ft.
Gutters & downpipes – copper $10.00 – 25.00 lin.ft.
Downpipe Extension – replace $15.00 – 75.00 each
Eaves cleaning – end of fall $150.00 – 250.00

 

Fascia, Soffit & Exterior Trim – Supply & installed
All aluminum & vinyl soffit or fascia is usually installed over a solid base like plywood-extra is required for prefabrication.
Wood Fascia Board – non painted $2.00 – 3.75 lin.ft.
Aluminum fascia $1.80 – 3.50 lin.ft.
Vinyl fascia $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Aluminum soffits $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Vinyl soffits $1.70 – 3.00 lin.ft.
Decorative trims – wall mouldings $6.00 – up lin.ft.
Decorative & functional vents $85.00 – $150 each

 

Exterior Finishes
* Pricing is per square foot of “board” not per square foot of house space.
Aluminum siding-non insulated $1.90 – 3.00 sq.ft.
(if you were making the exterior truly maintenace free then you would have to add the costs for fascia, soffit,gutter & downpipe installation for the total price for a complete upgrade to aluminum siding-watch out for these pricing tricks or “extra’s” – see above pricing)
Aluminum siding – some insulation $2.40 – 4.80 sq.ft.
Aluminum siding – R2000 $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Vinyl siding – not insulated $1.80 – 3.60 sq.ft.
Hardboard Siding – non insulated $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Wood siding – paint grade $1.80 – 4.80 sq.ft.
Wood siding – clear cedar $3.60 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Vinyl shakes $1.80 – 3.60 sq.ft.
Aluminum cladding – of windows, sills, posts etc. $1.80 – 12.00 lin.ft.
Exterior Stucco – sand & cement $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Exterior Stucco – Latex based $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Repointing – brick work $7.00 -10.00 sq.ft.
Brick – new installation $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Brick extra’s -arches over windows,coined corners $24.00 – up each
Brick -cost per 1,000 (average);approx 3.33/sq.ft. $440.00 – 850.00
Brick -labour cost per 1,000; you supply sand $550.00 – up
Replace brick $18.00 – up sq.ft.
Parapet Wall – reconstruction $25.00 – up sq.ft.
Stone Work – Man made stone $12.00 – 13.40 sq.ft.
Stone Work – Natural stone $20.00 – 36.00 sq.ft.
Brick cleaning-Chemical wash $2.40 – 7.20 sq.ft.
Brick Sealing -after cleaning $0.65 – 1.80 sq.ft.
Exterior painting- fascia, soffit, doors, windows $1,200.00- up
Exterior painting- including trims & walls $2,500.00 – up
Foundation Parging $2.00 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Exterior foundation damp proofing $4,000.00 – up
Damp proofing – new house construction $1,200.00 – 1,500.00
* includes perimeter drainage tile, 3/4 gravel, tar spray & plastic membrane skirt – usually this is included in the foundation price
Perimeter drainage tiles, O-pipe $4,000.00 – up
Foundation Cracks -wet basement $400.00 – 500.00
Interior foundation damp proofing /French Drain installation $2,200.00 – up / – up
Yard drainage $250.00 – up
Storm Windows – supplied & installed $175.00 – up each
Storm doors $375.00 – up each
Resurface existing Asphalt driveway $2.00 – 3.00 sq.ft.
Asphalt driveway – new construction $1.00 – 1.25 sq.ft.
Seal Asphalt driveway $75.00 – up
Install interlocking paving stone driveway $2.00 – 7.00 sq.ft.
New concrete driveway – plain $4.00 – 7.00 sq.ft.
New concrete driveway – stamped; stampcrete $7.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Install wooden deck $1,200.00 – up
Deck – Supply and Install $20.00 sq.ft.
Concrete patio $6.00 – 10.00 sq.ft.
Concrete patio stones $2.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Exterior basement stairway restoration $1,500 – up
Exterior basement stairway installation $4,000.00 – up
Exterior basement stairway installation – new house $1,200.00 – 1,500.00 each
Existing Exterior basement stairway – drainage $500.00 – up
Demolition and removal of detached garage $2,300 – up
Construction of a new detached garage – single $10,000.00 – up
Construction of a new detached garage – double $15,000.00 – up
Garage doors – single $800.00 – 1,500.00
Garage doors – double $1000.00 – 2,000.00
* eg. 2 maintenance free aluminum insulated doors for a new house construction or rough – in ready installation costs $1,200.00 in the London Area.
Garage door opener $350.00 – 500.00
Replace porch or deck flooring $3.00 – up
Replace porch or deck skirting $3.00 – up
Replace porch stairs – wood $200.00 – up
Replace porch stairs – concrete $300.00 – up
Replace porch stair railings $200.00 – up
Replace porch railings $8.00 – up lin.ft.
Retaining wall – wood $20.00 – up sq.ft.
Retaining wall – concrete $30.00 – up sq.ft.
Retaining wall – gabion;rock basket $25.00 – up sq.ft. /-up lin ft
Retaining wall – steel erosion control $130.00 -up lin.ft.
Property fencing – wood $15.00 – up lin.ft.
Property fencing – chain link $8.00 – up lin.ft.
Lawn – New sod $1.50 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Lawn – New seed; seeding – 1/4 acre lot $500.00 – up
Lawn sprinkler system $1,000.00 – up

 

Structure Modifications & Renovations
Foundation – Underpin one corner of house $3,000.00 – up
Foundation – Underpin or add $3,000.00 – up
Foundation – Lower basement floor by underpinning $5,000.00 – up
Lower basement floor with bench footings $5,000.00 – up
Replace load bearing basement beam $1,600.00 – up
Install additional joist along side for support $110.00 – up
Jackpost – install $325.00 – 550.00
Termite treatment – chemical $1,200.00 – up
Termite inspection $150.00 – 200.00
Opening or Removal of bearing wall $750.00 – 1,500.00
Opening & Installing door in interior wall $600.00 – up
Rebuild arch over door or window openings $500.00 – up
Install lintel in masonary wall opening $350.00 – up
Construct exterior basement stairwell $5,000.00 – up
Collar Ties $300.00 – up
Collar Tie bracing $150.00 – 250.00
Building an addition – basic quality $70.00 – 90.00 sq.ft.
Building an addition – good quality $90.00 – 110.00 sq.ft.
Building an addition – Custom quality $110.00 – up sq.ft.

 

Interior Renovations
Remove old plaster & install drywall $2.50 -5.00 sq.ft.
Install drywall over exiting plaster $1.50 – 3.00 (board) sq.ft.
New Plaster $8.00 – 11..00 sq.ft.
Install drywall in an unfinished area -supply and install/no insulation $7.00 – 9.00 sq.ft. floor space/.14 sq.ft. board
Texture spray ceiling $1.00 – up sq.ft.
* New house construction- 080 sq.ft. board -board, mud/tape, labour only.
Suspended Ceiling Tile Installation $2.50 – 6.00 sq.ft.
Acoustic Ceiling Tile Installation $1.50 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Sand & Finish existing wood floors $2.00 – 4.00 sq.ft.
Wood floor installation $5.50 – 12.00 sq.ft.
Ceramic Tile – Supply & install $10.00 – up sq.ft.
Ceramic Tile – labour only $5.50 -8.00 sq.ft.
Underlay – installation only $1.50 -2.00 sq.ft.
Vinyl floor tiles – supply & install $2.00 – up sq.ft.
Vinyl sheet flooring/linoleum $6.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – synthetic $15.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – natural wool $50.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – underpading $5.00 – up sq.yd.
Carpet – cleaning/steam/chemical $30.00 – up per room
Windows-replacement – 1,800 sq.ft. house $10,000.00 approx.
* amount may vary depending upon the situation.
Windows – sliders, casement, awning, doublehung – installed $140.00 – up
Windows – fixed, bay, bow, round – installed $1,200.00- up
Doors – exterior, insulated,metal $750.00 – up
Doors – exterior, solid wood $850.00 – up
Doors – exterior, fibreglass $900.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, insul., metal $1,200.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, solid wood $1,500.00 – up
Doors – exterior, double, fibreglass $2,000.00 – up
Replace entrance door latch & lock set $150.00 – up
Install decorative glass in entrance door $500.00 – up
New Storm door $450.00 – up
Install patio doors – brick wall $2,500.00 – up
Install patio doors – wood frame wall $2000.00 – up
Replace existing patio doors $1000.00 – 2000.00
Install basic skylight $1,000.00 – up
Install venting skylight $1,500.00 – up
Fireplace – Masonry $2,500.00 – up
* Note: Ont. Building Code for new house construction may require CO detector & fresh air exchanger ($2,500.00 – up) for wood burning fireplaces-gas does not require this.
Fireplace – Zero clearance $2,000.00 – up
Fireplace – Natural Gas $2,300.00 – up
Glass fireplace doors $250.00 – up
Install Fireplace damper $250.00 – up
Chimney cleaning $200.00 – 375.00
Video Chimney inspection $250.00 – up
Video Plumbing inspection $150.00 – up
* Video inspections start at $110/hr – plumbing, chimney – whatever the case.
Interior door – hollow core, hardware incl $150.00 – up
Interior door – solid core, hardware incl. $400.00 – up
French doors $600.00 – up
Bifold doors $75.00 – up
Louvred Bifold doors $150.00 – up
Sliding closet doors $200.00 – up
Sliding mirror closet doors $350.00 – up
Kitchen renovation – full $7,000.00 – up
Kitchen Cabinets – replace $150.00 – up lin.ft.
Kitchen counter – replace $25.00 – up lin.ft.
Stove fan-venting outside $475.00 – up
Ceiling fan – installed $200.00 – up
Painting – interior – whole house $1,500.00 – up
Wallpaper – hanging $2.00 – up sq.ft.
Central vacuum system $800.00 – up
Security System – you own $600.00 – up

 

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
Mid efficiency Furnace – supply & install $2,500.00 -3,500.00
High effiency furnace – supply & install $3,500.00 – 4,500.00
Boiler System $3,500.00 – up
Humidifier $400.00 -500.00
Electronic air cleaner $500.00 – 1,000.00
New circulating pump $450.00 – 700.00
Expansion tank $360.00 – 650.00
New Chimney liner $330.00 – 700.00
Remove old oil tank $300.00 – 800.00
Replace radiator $300.00 – 1,000.00
Replace radiator control valve $150.00 – 300.00
Install baseboard heaters $150.00 – 300.00
Convert furnace from oil to natural gas (if possible) $900.00 – 1,500.00
Change heating from Hot water to gas – single level $7,500.00 – 9,500.00
Change heating from Hot water to gas – double level $15,000.00 – 20,000.00
Change ducts from gravity to forced air $1,000.00 – 1,500.00
Duct cleaning $250.00 – 350.00
Annual Service $150.00 – 250.00
Air Conditioning – add to existing forced air $1,700.00 – 3,000.00
Heat Pump – add to existing /Geothermal $2,500.00 – 4,000.00 / ,000 & up
Replace compressor on heat pump/air conditioner $800.00 – 1,400.00
Air conditioning – independent system $8,000.00 – 15,000.00

 

Electrical
* Installation & supply is assumed, and the contractor is on the site for more than one electrical job listed below, otherwise sufficient allowances for travel time and increased costs/opportunity costs, should be made.
Upgrade service to 100 amps – incl. New breaker panel $850.00 – 1100.00
Upgrade service to 100 amps – no breaker panel $800.00 – 1200.00
Upgrade service to 200 amps $1,000.00 – 1,500.00
Replace main ground – public water sytem $200.00 – 350.00
Replace main ground – private well to ground rods $275.00 – 500.00
New Breaker Panel $700.00 – 1200.00
Auxiliary Panel $300.00 – 600.00
Replace circuit breaker – 20 amps or less $80.00 – 110.00
Add 120 V circuit – ie fridge, freezer etc $250.00 – 400.00
Install exterior outlet $250.00 – 400.00
Add 240 V circuit – ie. Stove, dryer $350.00 – 650.00
Add Kitchen split receptacle $250.00 – 450.00
Supply ground for std. receptacles $75.00 – 150.00
Replace receptacles with GFI (Ground Fault Interrupt) $90.00 – 120.00 each
Correct reversed polarity $15.00 – 25.00 each
Install switches $20.00 – 40.00 each
Install light fixture $100.00 – 250.00
Exterior light fixture $175.00 – 250.00

 

Plumbing
Replace old (galvanized or steel) piping w/ copper /Pex $1,500.00 – 4,000.00
Replace main water line to residence $1,900.00 – 4,000.00
Replace interior main shut off valve $275.00 – 375.00
Replace water heater $550.00 – 1,200.00
* or lease-may not cost you except monthly charges as low as $20/mth
Average monthly water heater rental $20/mth-up
Unclogging Toilet $150.00 – 200.00
Toilet Replacement -supply & install $300.00 – up
Replace toilet seal $100.00 – 200.00
Replace flushing mechanism $125.00 – 175.00
Supply & install bidet $500.00 – up
Replace vanity & counter – single basin $300.00 – up
Replace vanity & counter – double Basin $500.00 – up
Replace basin – vanity $175.00 – up
Replace basin – pedestal $325.00 – up
Replace faucets $150.00 – up
Replace bathtub & new ceramic tiles $1,500.00 – up
Refinish existing tub $1000.00 – up
Replace shower & tub faucets $325.00 – up
Replace tile tub area $800.00 – up
Replace caulk bathtub $175.00 – 350.00
Replace leaking shower stall pan $1,000.00 – 2000.00
Reconstruction of ceramic tile shower stall $1,500.00 – up
New installation of ceramic tile shower stall $1,500.00 – up
Installation of new plastic tub enclosure $550.00 – 850.00
Install PVC or fibreglass shower stall $1200.00 – 2,000.00
Install Whirlpool / Jacuzzi tub $2,000.00 – up
Install exhaust fan $375.00 – 500.00
Complete bathroom renovation $9,000.00 – up
Construction of a basement bathroom -plumbing only $3,600.00 – up
Install laundry tub $350.00 – 500.00
Install laundry facilities – water supply, drain $1,000.00 – up
Supply & install kitchen sink – single $350.00 – up
Supply & install kitchen sink – double $400.00 – up
Supply & install dishwasher $500.00 – 1,000.00
Dishwasher hook-up – rough-in complete $145.00 – 195.00
Dishwasher hook-up – no rough-in /electrical needed e.g. $195.00 – 350.00
Supply & install garbage disposal $300.00 – 600.00
Install stove hood $150.00 – up
Install solid waste pump $1,600.00 – 2,000.00
Connect waste piping to municipal sewers $2,000.00 – up
Clear out obstructions in sewer line $195.00 – up
Repair collapsed sewer line section $1200.00 – up
Video observation / investigation $110.00 / hr – up
Install submersible well pump $800.00 – up
Install suction or jet pump $600.00 – 1,000.00
Replace sewage ejector pump $500.00 – 800.00
Replace pump tank $250.00 – 500.00
Install water softener $1,000.00 – up
* Rental or lease – installation usually free w/ contract of approx. $20.00 /mth
Water softener rental or lease $20.00 – up /mth.
Outdoor hose / water valve / sediment faucet $150.00 – 300.00 each
Replace sump pump $295.00 – 385.00

 

Insulation
Insulate attic to current standards $0.50 – 2.50 sq.ft.
Insulation blown into flat roof or wall cavity $2.00 – 5.00 sq.ft.
Add attic vents $40.00 – 250.00 each
UFFI removal $10,000.00 – up
Exterior insulation using rigid boards $1,500.00 – up
Insulate basement interior $0.50 – up sq.ft.
Sprayed foam / uerethane foam $ ?

 

Your Home’s Components Life Expectancy Chart


Your Home’s Components Life Expectancy Chart

–  From InterNACHI

Consumers and inspectors and other professionals advising their clients should note that these life expectancies have been determined through research and testing based on regular recommended maintenance and conditions of normal wear and tear, and not extreme weather (or other) conditions, neglect, over-use or abuse.  Therefore, they should be used as guidelines only, and not relied upon as guarantees or warranties. 
 
*********************************************************************** 
Surface preparation and paint quality are the most important determinants of a paint’s life expectancy. Ultraviolet (UV) rays via sunshine can shorten life expectancy.  Additionally, conditions of high humidity indoors or outdoors can affect the lifespan of these components, which is why they should be inspected and maintained seasonally.
ADHESIVES, CAULK & PAINTS
YEARS
Caulking (interior & exterior) 5 to 10
Construction Glue 20+
Paint (exterior) 7 to 10
Paint (interior) 10 to 15
Roofing Adhesives/Cements 15+
Sealants 8
Stains 3 to 8
Appliance life expectancy depends to a great extent on the use it receives. Furthermore, consumers often replace appliances long before they become worn out due to changes in styling, technology and consumer preferences.
APPLIANCES       YEARS
Air Conditioner (window) 5 to 7
Compactor (trash) 6
Dehumidifier 8
Dishwasher 9
Disposal (food waste) 12
Dryer Vent  (plastic) 5
Dryer Vent  (steel) 20
Dryer (clothes) 13
Exhaust Fans 10
Freezer 10 to 20
Gas Oven 10 to 18
Hand Dryer 10 to 12
Humidifier (portable) 8
Microwave Oven 9
Range/Oven Hood 14
Electric Range 13 to 15
Gas Range 15 to 17
Refrigerator 9 to 13
Swamp Cooler 5 to 15
Washing Machine 5 to 15
Whole-House Vacuum System 20
Modern kitchens today are larger and more elaborate.  Together with the family room, they now form the “great room.”
CABINETRY & STORAGE    YEARS
Bathroom Cabinets 50+
Closet Shelves 100+
Entertainment Center/Home Office 10
Garage/Laundry Cabinets 70+
Kitchen Cabinets 50
Medicine Cabinet 25+
Modular (stock manufacturing-type) 50
Walls and ceilings last the full lifespan of the home.
CEILINGS & WALLS
YEARS
Acoustical Tile Ceiling 40+ (older than 25 years may contain asbestos)
Ceramic Tile 70+
Concrete 75+
Gypsum 75
Wood Paneling 20 to 50
Suspended Ceiling 25+
Natural stone countertops, which are less expensive than they were just a few years ago, are becoming more popular, and one can expect them to last a lifetime. Cultured marble countertops have a shorter life expectancy, however.
COUNTERTOPS YEARS
Concrete 50
Cultured Marble 20
Natural Stone 100+
Laminate 20 to 30
Resin 10+
Tile 100+
Wood 100+
Decks are exposed to a wide range of conditions in different climates, from wind and hail in some areas, to relatively consistent, dry weather in others. See FASTENERS & STEEL section for fasteners.
DECKS YEARS 
Deck Planks 15
Composite 8 to 25
Structural Wood 10 to 30
Exterior fiberglass, steel and wood doors will last as long as the house, while vinyl and screen doors have a shorter life expectancy. The gaskets/weatherstripping of exterior doors may have to be replaced every 5 to 8 years.
DOORS YEARS
Closet (interior) 100+
Fiberglass (exterior) 100+
Fire-Rated Steel (exterior) 100+
French (interior) 30 to 50
Screen (exterior) 30
Sliding Glass/Patio (exterior) 20 (for roller wheel/track repair/replacement)
Vinyl (exterior) 20
Wood (exterior) 100+
Wood (hollow-core interior) 20 to 30
Wood (solid-core interior) 30 to 100+
Copper-plated wiring, copper-clad aluminum, and bare copper wiring are expected to last a lifetime, whereas electrical accessories and lighting controls, such as dimmer switches, may need to be replaced after 10 years.  GFCIs could last 30 years, but much less if tripped regularly.
Remember that faulty, damaged or overloaded electrical circuits or equipment are the leading cause of house fires, so they should be inspected regularly and repaired or updated as needed.
ELECTRICAL YEARS
Accessories 10+
Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs) 30
Bare Copper 100+
Bulbs (compact fluorescent) 8,000 to 10,000+ hours
Bulbs (halogen) 4,000 to 8,000+ hours
Bulbs (incandescent) 1,000 to 2,000+ hours
Bulbs (LED) 30,000 to 50,000+ hours
Copper-Clad Aluminum 100+
Copper-Plated 100+
Fixtures 40
Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) up to 30
Lighting Controls 30+
Residential Propane Backup Generators 12
Service Panel 60
Solar Panels 20 to 30
Solar System Batteries 3 to 12
Wind Turbine Generators 20
Floor and roof trusses and laminated strand lumber are durable household components, and engineered trim may last 30 years.
ENGINEERED LUMBER YEARS
Engineered Joists 80+
Laminated Strand Lumber 100+
Laminated Veneer Lumber 80+
Trusses 100+

 

 

Fastener manufacturers do not give lifespans for their products because they vary too much based on where the fasteners are installed in a home, the materials in which they’re installed, and the local climate and environment.  However, inspectors can use the guidelines below to make educated judgments about the materials they inspect.
FASTENERS, CONNECTORS & STEEL
YEARS
Adjustable Steel Columns 50+
Fasteners (bright) 25 to 60
Fasteners (copper) 65 to 80+
Fasteners (galvanized) 10+
Fasteners (electro-galvanized) 15 to 45
Fasteners (hot-dipped galvanized) 35 to 60
Fasteners (stainless) 65 to 100+
Steel Beams 200+
Steel Columns 100+
Steel Plates 100+
Flooring life is dependent on maintenance and the amount of foot traffic the floor endures.
FLOORING YEARS
All Wood Floors 100+
Bamboo 100+
Brick Pavers 100+
Carpet 8 to 10
Concrete 50+
Engineered Wood 50+
Exotic Wood 100+
Granite 100+
Laminate 15 to 25
Linoleum 25
Marble 100+
Other Domestic Wood 100+
Slate 100
Terrazzo 75+
Tile 75 to 100
Vinyl 25
Concrete and poured-block footings and foundations will last a lifetime, assuming they were properly built.  Waterproofing with bituminous coating lasts 10 years, but if it cracks, it is immediately damaged.
FOUNDATIONS YEARS
Baseboard Waterproofing System 50
Bituminous-Coating Waterproofing 10
Concrete Block 100+
Insulated Concrete Forms (ICFs) 100
Post and Pier 20 to 65
Post and Tensioned Slab on Grade 100+
Poured-Concrete Footings and Foundation 100+
Slab on Grade (concrete) 100
Wood Foundation 5 to 40
Permanent Wood Foundation (PWF; treated) 75
Framing and structural systems have extended longevities; poured-concrete systems, timber frame houses and structural insulated panels will all last a lifetime.
FRAMING YEARS
Log 80 to 200
Poured-Concrete Systems 100+
Steel 100+
Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) 100+
Timber Frame 100+
The quality and frequency of use will affect the longevity of garage doors and openers.
GARAGES YEARS
Garage Doors 20 to 25
Garage Door Openers 10 to 15
Home technology systems have diverse life expectancies and may have to be upgraded due to evolution in technology.
HOME TECHNOLOGY YEARS
Built-In Audio 20
Carbon Monoxide Detectors* 5
Door Bells 45
Home Automation System 5 to 50
Intercoms 20
Security System 5 to 20
Smoke/Heat Detectors* less than 10
Wireless Home Networks 5+
* Batteries should be changed at least annually.
Thermostats may last 35 years but they are usually replaced before they fail due to technological improvements.
HVAC YEARS
Air Conditioner (central) 7 to 15
Air Exchanger 15
Attic Fan 15 to 25
Boiler 40
Burner 10+
Ceiling Fan 5 to 10
Condenser 8 to 20
Dampers 20+
Dehumidifier 8
Diffusers, Grilles and Registers 25
Ducting 60 to 100
Electric Radiant Heater 40
Evaporator Cooler 15 to 25
Furnace 15 to 25
Gas Fireplace 15 to 25
Heat Exchanger 10 to 15
Heat Pump 10 to 15
Heat-Recovery Ventilator 20
Hot-Water and Steam-Radiant Boiler 40
Humidifier 12
Induction and Fan-Coil Units 10 to 15
Chimney Cap (concrete) 100+
Chimney Cap (metal) 10 to 20
Chimney Cap (mortar) 15
Chimney Flue Tile 40 to 120
Thermostats 35
Ventilator 7
As long as they are not punctured, cut or burned and are kept dry and away from UV rays, cellulose, fiberglass and foam insulation materials will last a lifetime. This is true regardless of whether they were installed as loose-fill, housewrap or batts/rolls.
INSULATION & INFILTRATION BARRIERS YEARS
Batts/Rolls 100+
Black Paper (felt paper) 15 to 30
Cellulose 100+
Fiberglass 100+
Foamboard 100+
Housewrap 80+
Liquid-Applied Membrane 50
Loose-Fill 100+
Rock Wool 100+
Wrap Tape 80+
Masonry is one of the most enduring household components. Fireplaces, chimneys and brick veneers can last the lifetime of a home.
MASONRY & CONCRETE    YEARS
Brick 100+
Insulated Concrete Forms (hybrid block) 100+
Concrete Masonry Units (CMUs) 100+
Man-Made Stone 25
Masonry Sealant 2 to 20
Stone 100+
Stucco/EIFS 50+
Veneer 100+
Custom millwork and stair parts will last a lifetime and are typically only upgraded for aesthetic reasons.
MOLDING, MILLWORK & TRIM YEARS
Attic Stairs (pull-down) 50
Custom Millwork 100+
Pre-Built Stairs 100+
Stair Parts 100+
Stairs 100+
The lifetime of any wood product depends heavily on moisture intrusion.
PANELS YEARS
Flooring Underlayment 25
Hardboard 40
Particleboard 60
Plywood 100
Softwood 30
Oriented Strand Board (OSB) 60
Wall Panels 100+
The quality of plumbing fixtures varies dramatically.  The mineral content of water can shorten the life expectancy of water heaters and clog showerheads.  Also, some finishes may require special maintenance with approved cleaning agents per the manufacturers in order to last their expected service lives.
PLUMBING, FIXTURES & FAUCETS YEARS
ABS and PVC Waste Pipe 50 to 80
Accessible/ADA Handles 100+
Acrylic Kitchen Sink 50
Cast-Iron Bathtub 100
Cast-Iron Waste Pipe (above ground) 60
Cast-Iron Waste Pipe (below ground) 50 to 60
Concrete Waste Pipe 100+
Copper Water Lines 70
Enameled Steel Kitchen Sink 5 to 10+
Faucets and Spray Hose 15 to 20
Fiberglass Bathtub and Shower 20
Gas Lines (black steel) 75
Gas Lines (flex) 30
Hose Bibs 20 to 30
Instant (on-demand) Water Heater 10
PEX 40
Plastic Water Lines 75
Saunas/Steam Room 15 to 20
Sewer Grinder Pump 10
Shower Enclosure/Module 50
Shower Doors 20
Showerheads 100+ (if not clogged by mineral/other deposits)
Soapstone Kitchen Sink 100+
Sump Pump 7
Toilet Tank Components 5
Toilets, Bidets and Urinals 100+
Vent Fan (ceiling) 5 to 10
Vessel Sink (stone, glass, porcelain, copper) 5 to 20+
Water Heater (conventional) 6 to 12
Water Line (copper) 50
Water Line (plastic) 50
Well Pump 15
Water Softener 20
Whirlpool Tub 20 to 50

Radon systems have but one moving part:  the radon fan.

RADON SYSTEMS
YEARS
Air Exchanger 15
Barometric Backdraft Damper/Fresh-Air Intake 20
Caulking 5 to 10
Labeling 25
Manometer 15
Piping 50+
Radon Fan 5 to 8
The life of a roof depends on local weather conditions, building and design, material quality, and adequate maintenance.  Hot climates drastically reduce asphalt shingle life.  Roofs in areas that experience severe weather, such as hail, tornadoes and/or hurricanes may also experience a shorter-than-normal lifespan overall or may incur isolated damage that requires repair in order to ensure the service life of the surrounding roofing materials.
ROOFING YEARS
Aluminum Coating 3 to 7
Asphalt Shingles (3-tab) 20
Asphalt (architectural) 30
BUR (built-up roofing) 30
Cellulose Fiber 20
Clay/Concrete 100+
Coal and Tar 30
Copper 70+
EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) Rubber 15 to 25
Fiber Cement 25
Green (vegetation-covered) 5 to 40
Metal 40 to 80
Modified Bitumen 20
Simulated Slate 10 to 35
Slate 60 to 150
TPO 7 to 20
Wood 30
Outside siding materials typically last a lifetime.  Some exterior components may require protection through appropriate paints or sealants, as well as regular maintenance.  Also, while well-maintained and undamaged flashing can last a long time, it is their connections that tend to fail, so seasonal inspection and maintenance are strongly recommended.
SIDINGS, FLASHING & ACCESSORIES YEARS
Aluminum Siding 25 to 40+
Aluminum Gutters, Downspouts, Soffit and Fascia 20 to 40+
Asbestos Shingle 100
Brick 100+
Cementitious 100+
Copper Downspouts 100
Copper Gutters 50+
Engineered Wood 100+
Fiber Cement 100+
Galvanized Steel Gutters/Downspouts 20
Manufactured Stone 100+
Stone 100+
Stucco/EIFS 50+
Trim 25
Vinyl Siding 60
Vinyl Gutters and Downspouts 25+
Wood/Exterior Shutters 20
Site and landscaping elements have life expectancies that vary dramatically.
SITE & LANDSCAPING YEARS
American Red Clay 100+
Asphalt Driveway 15 to 20
Brick and Concrete Patio 15 to 25
Clay Paving 100+
Concrete Walks 40 to 50
Controllers 15
Gravel Walks 4 to 6
Mulch 1 to 2
Polyvinyl Fencing 100+
Sprinkler Heads 10 to 14
Underground PVC Piping 60+
Valves 20
Wood Chips 1 to 5
Wood Fencing 20
Swimming pools are comprised of many systems and components, all with varying life expectancies.
SWIMMING POOLS
YEARS
Concrete Shell 25+
Cover 7
Diving Board 10
Filter and Pump 10
Interior Finish 10 to 35
Vinyl Liner 10
Pool Water Heater 8
Waterline Tile 15+
Aluminum windows are expected to last between 15 and 20 years, while wooden windows should last nearly 30 years.
WINDOWS YEARS
Aluminum/Aluminum-Clad 15 to 20
Double-Pane 8 to 20
Skylights 10 to 20
Window Glazing 10+
Vinyl Windows 20 to 40
Wood 30+

Note: Life expectancy varies with usage, weather, installation, maintenance and quality of materials.  This list should be used only as a general guideline and not as a guarantee or warranty regarding the performance or life expectancy of any appliance, product, system or component.

Insulation R-Value Table

Insulation R-Value Table

Insulation Values For Commonly Found Materials

Component

R-Value Studs

R-Value Cavity

Assembly R-Value

Wall – Outside Air Film

0.17

0.17

Siding – Wood Bevel

0.80

0.80

Plywood Sheathing – 1/2″

0.63

0.63

3 1/2″ Fiberglass Batt

13.00

3 1/2″ Stud

4.38

1/2″ Drywall

0.45

0.45

Inside Air Film

0.68

0.68

Percent for 16″ o.c. + Additional studs

15%

85%

Total Wall Component R-Values

7.11

15.73

Wall Component U-Values

0.1406

0.0636

Total Wall Assembly R-Value

13.31

* This example is just for wood frame construction. Steel studs are a more complicated calculation.

R-Value Table – English (US) Units

Material

R/
Inch
hr·ft2·°F/Btu

R/
Thickness
hr·ft2·°F/Btu

Insulation Materials
Fiberglass Batts

3.14-4.30

   3 1/2″ Fiberglass Batt

11.00

   3 5/8″ Fiberglass Batt

13.00

   3 1/2″ Fiberglass Batt (high density)

15.00

   6 1/2″ Fiberglass Batt

19.00

   5 1/4″ Fiberglass Batt (high density)

21.00

   8″ Fiberglass Batt

25.00

   8″ Fiberglass Batt (high density)

30.00

   9 1/2″ Fiberglass Batt

30.00

   12″ Fiberglass Batt

38.00

Fiberglass Blown (attic)

2.20-4.30

Fiberglass Blown (wall)

3.70-4.30

Rock Wool Batt

3.14-4.00

Rock Wool Blown (attic)

3.10-4.00

Rock Wool Blown (wall)

3.10-4.00

Cellulose Blown (attic)

3.60-3.701

Cellulose Blown (wall)

3.80-3.901

Vermiculite

2.13

Autoclaved Aerated Concrete

1.05

Urea Terpolymer Foam

4.48

Rigid Fiberglass (> 4lb/ft3)

4.00

Expanded Polystyrene (beadboard)

4.00

Extruded Polystyrene

5.00

Polyurethane (foamed-in-place)

6.25

Polyisocyanurate (foil-faced)

7.20

Construction Materials
Concrete Block 4″

0.80

Concrete Block 8″

1.11

Concrete Block 12″

1.28

Brick 4″ common

0.80

Brick 4″ face

0.44

Poured Concrete

0.08

Soft Wood Lumber

1.25

   2″ nominal (1 1/2″)

1.88

   2×4 (3 1/2″)

4.38

   2×6 (5 1/2″)

6.88

Cedar Logs and Lumber

1.33

Sheathing Materials
Plywood

1.25

   1/4″

0.31

   3/8″

0.47

   1/2″

0.63

   5/8″

0.77

   3/4″

0.94

Fiberboard

2.64

   1/2″

1.32

   25/32″

2.06

Fiberglass (3/4″)

3.00

   (1″)

4.00

   (1 1/2″)

6.00

Extruded Polystyrene (3/4″)

3.75

   (1″)

5.00

   (1 1/2″)

7.50

Foil-faced Polyisocyanurate
(3/4″)

5.40

   (1″)

7.20

   (1 1/2″)

10.80

Siding Materials
Hardboard (1/2″)

0.34

Plywood (5/8″)

0.77

   (3/4″)

0.93

Wood Bevel Lapped

0.80

Aluminum, Steel, Vinyl
(hollow backed)

0.61

   (w/ 1/2″ Insulating board)

1.80

Brick 4″

0.44

 

Interior Finish Materials
Gypsum Board (drywall 1/2″)

0.45

   (5/8″)

0.56

Paneling (3/8″)

0.47

Flooring Materials
Plywood

1.25

   (3/4″)

0.93

Particle Board (underlayment)

1.31

   (5/8″)

0.82

Hardwood Flooring

0.91

   (3/4″)

0.68

Tile, Linoleum

0.05

Carpet (fibrous pad)

2.08

   (rubber pad)

1.23

Roofing Materials
Asphalt Shingles

0.44

Wood Shingles

0.97

Windows
Single Glass

0.91

   w/storm

2.00

Double insulating glass
(3/16″) air space

1.61

   (1/4″ air space)

1.69

   (1/2″ air space)

2.04

   (3/4″ air space)

2.38

   (1/2″ w/ Low-E 0.20)

3.13

   (w/ suspended film)

2.77

   (w/ 2 suspended films)

3.85

   (w/ suspended film and low-E)

4.05

Triple insulating glass
(1/4″ air spaces)

2.56

   (1/2″ air spaces)

3.23

Addition for tight fitting drapes or shades, or closed blinds

0.29

Doors
Wood Hollow Core Flush
(1 3/4″)

2.17

   Solid Core Flush (1 3/4″)

3.03

   Solid Core Flush (2 1/4″)

3.70

   Panel Door w/ 7/16″ Panels
(1 3/4″)

1.85

Storm Door (wood 50% glass)

1.25

   (metal)

1.00

Metal Insulating
(2″ w/ urethane)

15.00

Air Films
Interior Ceiling

0.61

Interior Wall

0.68

Exterior

0.17

Air Spaces
1/2″ to 4″ approximately

1.00

 

AIR CONDITIONING AGE & CAPACITY

AIR CONDITIONING AGE & CAPACITY

Home Inspection Services | Professional Home Inspection Services

AIR CONDITIONING AGE & CAPACITY

As a rule-of-thumb, capacity information is encoded by air conditioning manufactures in the model number and date of
manufacture info in the serial number.

There are 12,000 Btu’s per ton of cooling, and air conditioners are sized by every ½ ton.
Manufacturers often encode the approximate rating in Btu’s somewhere in the model number. THEREFORE IT IS OFTEN SIMPLE TO SCAN THE
MODEL NUMBER FOR A TWO-DIGIT NUMBER THAT IS DIVISIBLE BY 6 AND TO DIVIDE IT BY 12 TO
DETERMINE THE CAPACITY RATING IN TONS.
This number can be elusive, as it is not always exactly divisible by 6.
Some manufacturer’s systems make this easier than others. To complicate matters, some manufacturers have
changed their systems of encoding data over time.

AMANA
Age: Use B-L-A-C-K H-O-R-S-E code B = 71 or 81 H = 76 or 86
L = 72 or 82 O = 77 or 87
A = 73 or 83 R = 78 or 88
C = 74 or 84 S = 69, 79 or 89
K = 75 or 85 E = 70, 80 or 90

BRYANT
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number usually (but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons.
Example: 56BAB0042000A0
42 = size on thousands of BTU
42,000 Btu = 3½ ton
From 1964 through 1979 Bryant encoded age information in the R = 1964 A = 1972
serial number with the first two digits indicating week of S = 1965 B = 1973
manufacture and the letter following those first two numbers T = 1966 C = 1974
indicating the year beginning R = 1964: U = 1967 D = 1975
V = 1968 E = 1976
W = 1969 F = 1977
X = 1970 G = 1978
Y = 1971 H = 1979
In subsequent years Bryant simplified its system where, the first two digits of serial number = Week of manufacture.
Third & fourth digits = Year of manufacture. Example: 3188XXXXXX = 31st week of 1988.

CARRIER
Carrier has used several different codes at different plants. Information below refers to commonly used codes.
Capacity: Commonly found in the last three to five digits of model number, sometimes in 100s of Btus sometimes in
tons
Example:
001 = 1.5 ton, 002 = 2 ton, 003 = 2.5 ton, 004 = 3 ton, 004-5 = 3.5 ton, 005 = 4 ton, 006 = 5 ton
Or
18xx = 1.5 ton, 24xx = 2 ton, 30xx = 2.5 ton, 36xx = 3 ton, 42xx = 3.5 ton, 48xx = 4 ton, 60xx = 5 ton
Or
14xx = 1 ton, 18xx = 1.5 ton, 024 = 2 ton, 030 = 2.5 ton, 036 = 3 ton, 042 = 3.5 ton, 048 = 4 ton, 060 = 5 ton

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Age: Through the 1960s Carrier used the first digit of the serial number to indicate the year of manufacture. Example:
3xxxxx = 1963, 4xxxxx = 1964, 5xxxxx = 1965, etc.
Beginning in 1970 Carrier began to use a letter followed by a single digit year.
Example: A1 = January 1971, B2 = February 1972, M5 = December 1975
Note: No letter I
A=Jan G=Jul
B=Feb H= Aug
C=Mar J= Sept
D=Apr K= Oct
E=May L= Nov
F= Jun M= Dec
More recently Carrier has simplified things using the first four digits of the serial number to signify the age, where the
first two digits indicate the week and the third and fourth digits indicate the year of manufacture (similar to Bryant).
Example: 3298xxxxxx = 32nd week of 1998

CHRYSLER AIR TEMP
Capacity: Rating in tons found in the fourth and fifth digits of the model number
0 = 1 1.5 ton
2 = 2 ton
3 = 2.5 ton
4 = 3 ton
5 = 4 ton
6 = 5 ton
Example: xx06xxxx = 5 ton

CLIMATROL
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number (usually, but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons. It is often in the last three to five digits, but is sometimes closer to the middle.

COASTLINE
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number (usually, but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons. It is often in the last three to five digits, but is sometimes closer to the middle.

COLEMAN
Coleman has used several different codes at different plants. Information below refers to some commonly used codes.
Capacity: Commonly found in the third and fourth digits of the model number sometimes in 100s of Btu’s and
sometimes as tons.
Example: xx30 = 2.5 ton, xx48 = 4 ton or xx02 = 2 ton, xx05 = 5 ton

DAY-NIGHT LATER MANUFACTURED AS “BDP” (BRYANT, DAY-NIGHT, PAYNE)
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number (usually, but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons. It is often in the last three to five digits, but is sometimes closer to the middle.
Age: First two letters of the serial number indicate age, where the first letter is the month and the second letter the year
of manufacture beginning with 1970
A=1970, B=1971, C=1972, Etc.

DUCANE
Two different formats on serial numbers are used. All of serial numbers are ten characters.
The most common format is all ten characters are numeric. In this format the numbers in position 7 and 8 indicate the
calendar year and the numbers in position 9 and 10 indicate the week of the year.
Example is XXXXXX9933 where the 99 would be 1999 and the 33 would be the 33rd week of the year (1999).
The more recent format is ten characters. The format is that the first four characters are numeric, the fifth character is
alpha, and the last five characters are numeric.
The year code is determined from the numbers in the 3rd and 4th position, which would be the last 2 digits of the
calendar year (ex: 06=2006). The fifth character which is alpha represents the month with A=January and
M=December and but they do not use the LETTER I.

FEDDERS
Capacity: Last two digits of the model number indicate 1000s of Btus
Example: CF30 = 2.5 ton
Age (through 1977): Last two letters of serial number
indicate month & year beginning with September 1966
A=Sept
B=Oct
C=Nov
Etc
A= 1966
B=1967
C=1968
Etc.
Note: I – not used
Example:
xxxxAA = September 1966, xxxxBC = October 1968

GENERAL ELECTRIC
Capacity: Last three digits of model number indicate approximate rating in 1000s of Btus
Example: 21TC030A = 2.5 ton
Age: Last three digits of serial number indicate date of manufacture, where the first digit indicates the year and the
second and third indicate the week
Example: xxxxxx241 = 41st week of 1982

KEEPRITE
The date of product/ manufacture or age of a Keeprite furnace or air conditioner can be determined from the serial
number Serial number styles/ formats found:
Style 1: G051650885, Style 2: L920671787, Style 3: 9414B39332
First two numbers represent YEAR. Second two represent WEEK.

LENNOX
Capacity: Lennox has its own code found between hyphens in the model number
211=1.5 ton 411=3 ton 651=4.5 ton
261=2 ton 461=3.5 ton
311=2.5 ton 511=4 ton
Example: CHP16H-261-1P = 2 ton
Age: Prior to 1974 the first three digits of the serial number indicate the date of manufacture where the first two digits
indicate the year and the third is the month.
Example: 732xxxx = February 1973
Beginning in 1974 the third and fourth digits indicate the year followed by a letter indicating the month.
Note: I not used
A=Jan, B=Feb, C=Mar, Etc.

RHEEM OR RUUD
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number (usually, but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons.
Example: RPGC-037JA = 3 ton
Age: Four digits of serial number indicate date of manufacture where first two indicate the week and the third and
fourth are the year. In the 1960s and early `70s this was the last four digits. More recently date of manufacture
information is found closer to the middle of the serial number.
Example: xxxx1872 = 18th week of 1972

TAPPAN
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits in the model number (usually, but not always) divisible by 6 and divide by 12
to convert to tons.
Example: CM36-11B,T = 3 ton

TRANE
Capacity: Trane has used a number of different methods for encoding capacity information in the model number. It is
commonly found in the first three digits sometimes and Btus, sometimes as tons.
Example: SPCC-B504-A = 5.0 ton, Or TWS748A = 48,000 Btu = 4 ton
Age: Through the seventies date of manufacture information is found as a number and a letter in the serial number
where the number is the single digit year and the letter indicates the month.
A=Jan, B=Feb, C=Mar, Etc. Example: 1C-xxxx = March 1971
In the early `80s Trane began to stamp the date of manufacture in the lower right hand corner of the data plate.

WHIRLPOOL
Capacity: Look for those elusive two digits (often the first two digits) in the model number (sometimes, but not always)
divisible by 6. Divide by 12 to convert to tons.
Age: Date of manufacture information is encoded in the serial number where a letter indicates the decade, first digit
year, the third and fourth digits indicate the week.
G=1970s, H=1980s Example: H43571485 = 35th week of 1984

YORK   HVAC DATING (Unitary Products since 1984)
Note: they skip the letters I, O, Q, U, Z.
Year of make indicated by 3rd letter in the serial number.
1971 – A
1972 – B
1973 – C
1974 – D
1975 – E
1976 – F
1977 – G
1978 – H
1979 – J
1980 – K
1981 – L
1982 – M
1983 – N
1984 – P
1985 – R
1986 – S
1987 – T
1988 – V
1989 – W
1990 – X
1991 – Y
1992 – A
1993 – B
1994 – C
1995 – D
1996 – E
1997 – F
1998 – G
1999 – H
2000 – J
2001 – K
2002 – L
2003 – M
2004 – N
2005 – P

YORK NEW SERIAL NUMBER — OCTOBER, 2004 TO THE PRESENT DAY

Here how to read the new serial number: W 0 E 4 298223
2nd and 4th digits 0 and 4 (number) is the year of manufacture.
To find the year of manufacture you have to combine the 2nd digits with the 4th digits.
Ex. W 0 E 4 298223 was made in 2004. W 0 E 6 298223 was made in 2006. W 1 E 0 298223 was made in 2010.
More examples: If the 2nd and 4th digits look like this: 2nd digits = 0 and the 4th digits is 5 = 2005
07 = 2007
11 = 2011

Barrie Home Inspection Directory lists the Best Professional Home Inspectors in the Barrie, Orillia Alliston and Innisfil area. When buying a new home choose from the best qualified local home inspectors. Enjoy Peace of Mind when making one of the biggest investments in your future.

Construction Inspections and Project Oversight in Southern Ontario provided by Construction Inspections

Buying a New Home – Tarion Warranty Facts

TARION WARRANTY

New Home Warranty

It’s on the House Aubrey LeBlanc Toronto Star Saturday Dec. 16/95  “New In Homes Section”  Separating Fact from Fiction

Separating fact from fiction is every new home buyer’s responsibility when it comes to clearly understanding their new home warranty.

Fiction: Some consumers assume the Ontario New Home Warranty Program (ONHWP) offers blanket warranty coverage.

Fact: For a one-time fee, home owners receive a comprehensive financial and construction defect warranty.

The warranty program provides $100,000 total maximum coverage on each home or condominium unit and deposit loss, not exceeding $20,000. The program also offers protection against delayed closings, delayed occupancy and substitutions made without your agreement if the items of construction or finishing were specified in the agreement of purchase and sale.

New home owners receive a one-year warranty against defects in work materials and Ontario Building Code violations.

For homes enrolled on or after Jan. 1, 1991, the builder provides a two-year warranty against: water penetration through the building envelope including the basement or foundation walls; defects in the electrical, plumbing and heating delivery systems; protection against health and safety Ontario Building Code violations. Materials and work in the exterior cladding, caulking, windows and doors must also be defect free.

New homes enrolled on or after Jan. 1, 1991, have major structural defect coverage lasting for seven years while homes enrolled before that date are covered up to five years.

Fiction: Many home owners believe the warranty program’s warranty coverage has an unlimited time period. Unfortunately, new home owners only realize their mistake after they lodge a complaint of claim when the warranty on the particular problem has expired.

Fact: New home owners should document all problems in writing before the warranty period ends. The warranty program can not pay claims if we don’t have notice of the problem within the warranty time lines. Forward copies of this documentation by registered mail to the builder and the warranty program. Home owners should note giving notice on the Certificate of Completion and Possession is not sufficient Fiction: Some consumers and professionals involved in the home buying process assume all resale homes are automatically not entitled to warranty protection.

Fact: Since the program’s warranty coverage is transferred with title and does not remain with the owner, some resale homes are covered by warranty. The program’s coverage takes effect from the date of possession and remains in effect on the house or condominium unit even if it is sold before the end of the warranty period to a new owner.

Fiction: Once they move into their new abode, home owners can sit back and let their new home warranty work for them.

Fact: Proper maintenance of a new home not only protects a home owner’s major investment but ensures they receive all the warranty coverage offered by the warranty program. Problems caused by home owner neglect, such as allowing caulking to wear down leading to moisture damage, are not covered.

Fiction: Home owners who encounter problems in the homes only need to contact their builder. Fact: If home owners discover a problem they should fully document it in writing and send it to the builder and a copy to the warranty program prior to the end of the warranty period. This documentation defines and dates the defect. In your letter describe the problem and ask the builder to correct it. Include the home’s enrolment number, the complete address, the lot and plan numbers or the condominium address and unit number.

The warranty program will stand in the builder’s shoes if the builder is unable to correct the defect.

Fiction: Some new home buyers, lawyers and real estate agents believe that HUDAC still exists.

Fact: The acronym HUDAC stands for the Housing and Urban Development Association of Canada, an organization founded in 1971. It administered the voluntary warranty program until 1976 when the provincial government passed the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act making the program mandatory. HUDAC continued until 1983 when the program took on its new name, the Ontario New Home Warranty Program.

The facts regarding the program and new home warranty are explained in the booklet, What Every New Home Buyer Should Know.

To obtain your free copy con tact your nearest ONHWP office or call toll free 1-800-668-7504.